Jawaharlal Nehru’s Death Anniversary: Know About India’s First PM


Jawaharlal Nehru was also the longest-serving prime minister of the country.

Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru was the first Prime Minister of India. He was also the longest-serving prime minister of the country and remained in office for about 17 years โ€” from 1947 till he died at the age of 74 on May 27, 1964.

Fondly called โ€œChacha Nehruโ€, he loved children very much and his birthday is celebrated as โ€œChildren’s Dayโ€. It is said that he was the architect of modern India and laid the foundations of several institutions that today contribute to India’s growth, development, and security.

Early life

Jawaharlal Nehru studied at home under private tutors till the age of 15 and then he moved to England to pursue higher studies. He returned to India at the age of 22 to practice law with his father, Motilal Nehru.

But he jumped straight into politics. One of the prominent politicians of India, Jawaharlal Nehru had an interest in politics from a young age. As a student, he would study about nations that struggled against foreign domination. Inevitably, he was drawn into India’s freedom movement.

Tryst with Congress and Mahatma Gandhi

Jawaharlal Nehru attended the Indian National Congress’ meeting in Bankipore, Patna, as a delegate in 1912. Four years later, he met Mahatma Gandhi for the first time and felt immensely inspired by him. He began working closely with Mahatma Gandhi for India’s independence.

In 1920, Jawaharlal Nehru organised the first Kisan March in Pratapgarh district of Uttar Pradesh. Between 1920 and 1922, he was imprisoned twice in connection with the Non-Cooperation Movement launched by Mahatma Gandhi.

Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru became the General Secretary of the Congress in September 1923. He was sworn in as the first Prime Minister of India on August 15, 1947.

In 1963, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru had a minor stroke, and in January 1964, he had a more serious attack. He died of a third and deadly stroke a few months later, on May 27, 1964.

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